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Highlights of the R24 Release of 3D InterOp

Wed Jul 17, 2013

The R24 release of 3D InterOp is now available for download. Although they are available online, not everyone pours over the 3D InterOp Release Notes for R24 like we might hope.  What follows is a shorter summary of what’s new in 3D InterOp Suite R24. The description of what’s new falls into three areas; new products, functional enhancements, and platform changes.

Addressing the first, 'new products' area, several additions are included in the R24 release of 3D InterOp. 3D InterOp Graphical now provides the ability to import Solid Edge files. In addition, the new Solid Edge Reader Component allows the import of product structure or exact geometry. The Solid Edge Reader Component is also available as a Direct translator or a Parasolid kernel-based translator. Still on the subject of expanded graphical import, the STEP Graphical Component in 3D InterOp now supports importing graphical PMI from STEP files.

Beyond data translation, many applications have a need to publish graphical data. 3D InterOp Graphical now provides support for writing 3D PDF files. This provides an easy way to distribute 3D information to an audience using the ubiquitous Adobe PDF Reader.

The second area describes the functional enhancements in the R24 release. This is by far the largest area with significant enhancements to every translator. As with each release, 3D InterOp R24 includes faster performance for every translator, especially for large multi-body parts. By leveraging the benefits of multi-processing, most applications should see up to 40% faster translation.

One of the unique characteristics of 3D InterOp translators is the ability to import the various data types as independent chapters of a book. Applications can selectively access product structure, graphical data, geometry, or PMI information. This offers tremendous flexibility to application developers. However, once an application imports data, R24 provides the ability to associate information between these different 'data buckets'. For example, applications can relate PMI information with the Geometry that’s associated with a given GEOMTOL. Or functionality can be presented which allows a user to associate (or link) the graphical display with the associated PMI information highlighted. In other words, this new functionality provides full associativity with owning model geometry and datum / datum targets enabling the applications to walk from graphical PMI to semantic PMI similar to originating source CAD system.

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3D InterOp in a Multi-Core World: Part 1

Wed Mar 13, 2013

Try to buy a single-core laptop today and you’ll have a difficult time even finding one.  The leading computer manufacturers offer at least dual-core for base models of their economy lines, even for laptops.  Let that sink in.  Our days of single core machines, even laptops, are over.  Many of the leading mobile products are also at least dual-core with higher end products having even more cores.

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Interface Design and Why the Light on the Man's Head Glows

Fri Mar 11, 2011

One of the common phrases that comes up a lot here, especially with respect to interface discussions, is the phrase "What vs. How." I usually forget to think about what this really means, but last night I got a vivid illustration of the concept.

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Contract Checks: Once and Only Once for Unit Testing (Part II)

Tue Feb 1, 2011

In Part I of this post, I pointed out a problem with xUnit tests: it is difficult to obey Once and Only Once when the validation assertions are outside the method(s) being tested.  The solution, as I mentioned in my preceding post about contract checks, is to move as many assertions as make sense into contract checks. This has many benefits, most of which address the principles Stef was looking for (and the frustrations she encountered in applying them to testing Spatial's 3D InterOp product) in her post:

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